Suicide Prevention: How You Can Help

Recognizing the signs of emotional pain or suicidal thoughts is not always obvious. Learning how to identify signs of suicide in yourself, loved one, co-worker, or friend may be the first step in helping those who might be considering self-harm or suicide. Recognizing the signs of emotional pain or suicidal thoughts is not always obvious.

Learning how to identify signs of suicide in yourself, loved one, co-worker, or friend may be the first step in helping those who might be considering self-harm or suicide.

Here is what to look for:

• Talking about wanting to die or suicide
• Feeling hopeless, desperate, trapped
• Giving away possessions
• Putting affairs in order
• Reckless Behavior
• Anger
• Increased drug or alcohol use
• Withdrawal
• Anxiety or agitation
• Changes in sleep
• Sudden mood change
• No sense of purpose

Asking a loved one whether or not they are thinking about suicide is incredibly difficult, but it could save their life. If you are concerned about someone, start the conversation. Here are some tips on how to open a conversation:

• Ask “How are you feeling?” and mention any warning signs that you have noticed.
• Be direct and ask the person if they are thinking about suicide or harming themselves.
• Most importantly, listen. Often suicidal thoughts occur when the person feels there is no one who cares. Listening can save lives.
• Be prepared to assist the person in finding professional help.

In a crisis…

If a person is suicidal, do not leave them alone.

If you are suicidal, call 911 or the 24/7 crisis hotline. It’s absolutely critical you talk to someone immediately.

Crisis Intervention Hotline:
Tuscarawas Hotline: 330.343.1811
Carroll Hotline: 330.627.5240

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
1.800.273.TALK